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How to Climb the Property Ladder for the First Time

So, you’ve made it to the figurative ladder that climbs to new heights: your first home. It’s a symbol of success, or frustration, or some in-between common ground that negotiates between your hard work and anxieties. First time buying is an adult exercise tense with agony and, yet, filled with delight in equal measure.

First time homes

The stories we trade over our first home – what brought us here – are often troubled by the economic pains of getting there in the first place. Professionals often turn to labour, both a mental and physical effort, to try and match the pace of the housing market. Budgetarily, the luxuries of a lifestyle can be leaned by trimming the routine monthly costs and by building up savings. For millennials aspiring for their first property, however, there are seemingly few routes to owning a home.

If not the largest purchase, a house, or a home, has become a kind of discipline in financial planning. Saving towards that ideal property comes with a couple of caveats, or hidden truths, that first time buyers should be aware of.

Setting up expectations

We openly discuss the pain of house-ownership, of actually getting there, because it quickly becomes a causal part of the process. Let-downs, upsets and frustrations are inventible in the journey of searching for a property. We suggest setting up fair expectations, a kind of mental preparedness, so that you can steer away from disappointment, and visualise a property as an actual financial reality. The property search, as a process, will also delight you, especially when a house becomes a home.

Think Life aspires to help you achieve certain revelations, mostly financial, about getting home. The hurdles in the market, or the ones unique to first time buyers, include set-backs in finances, such as lacklustre planning, weak savings to meet the minimum threshold (for a deposit the average save is between 5% to 20%), or pre-existing debt (outstanding loans, for example). These issues all relate to a question of ‘affordability’. Your budgets should focus on comfortably answering to the kind of prudence required to enter the market.

According the annual English Housing Survey young people are buying into new homes – a new optimism is growing from economic activity – yet the average age of the first-time homeowner is gradually, if casually, on the rise.

The common pains

The common hurdles are roughly universal, with income being exhausted on rented accommodation, or redirected into passions like travel. Other costs, often invisible to the naked eye, can quickly build up, such as the solicitors free, valuation fees, removal costs, any surveying required, furnishings (and decorating) and the near-essential insurance to cover the mortgage.

It is crucial to save early on, and as often as possible, in order to build up a heavy deposit to place against your dream home. In this journey to buying a home – because saving up is a patient discipline – you should clean up your credit history, which essentially means working on a healthy record for borrowing money. Limit applications against your credit, ensure debts are tied up and tidy away your monthly outgoings so that your income is spent against justified pursuits. Knowing your monthly budget intimately is just one of the ways you can close the gap between yourself and a new home – this means being smart with your mobile phone contract, any TV portal subscriptions, or other spends that impact your reputation with money lenders.

Feel at home, not just symbolically

Closing in on home is not only about saving patiently over time, but also gaming economic initiatives to improve your odds. One way to conquer the housing market is to develop your knowhow on the schemes you’re eligible for. Saving, for example, isn’t merely a matter of aging your income well, but embracing Help-To-Buy ISA’s, or other helpful schemes, that can build up your money over time tied to handsome interest rates.

The government can become your ally with new incentives now springing up to motivate homebuyers into the market. Help To Buy, your new buzzword, is a hotly growing trend for first time homebuyers seeking out that added financial boost. There are two types:

  1. Shared Ownership, as the label infers, means buying into a share against your property (usually between 25% and 75% of the total value). The rest is paid via rent until you can afford a larger share.
  2. An Equity Loan is a kind of borrowable sum that means you pay a 5% cash deposit against your home along with mortgaging 75% of its value. The other 20% is gifted as a loaned value from the government.

Whether you’re researching your mortgage, or a more active buyer, there are useful wisdoms to take with you on your journey to buying a house and making it a home. In an optimistic forecast, the upheaval of buying a property is no longer a lonely undertaking. There are ways to inspire slow, if wanting, saving accounts to meet a basic deposit, just as there are new initiatives to embrace that can help nudge you that step closer to home.

Top Takeaways:

  1. Amidst the trading of advice online for savvy savings, the conventional truths remain salient to this day. The best, if worthiest advice, is to empower yourself with patience. The journey to finding your right property can likely be tough, so having appropriate expectations can be a useful guide.
  2. Research your options thoroughly. Not only are generous initiatives available to help you buy a house, but in certain scenarios you could be exempt from Stamp Duty. First time buyers can receive relief when searching for a property to call home.

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